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The Kingdom Exists

How can you have balance and harmony when a lot of people know about our history? We know who we are. We know the land is ours. We know it was stolen.

–Abraham Kamakawiwo’ole
testimony at public meeting on Mauna Kea Science Reserve Master Plan
May 1999

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Whereas, in pursuance of the conspiracy to overthrow the Government of Hawaii, the United States Minister and the naval representatives of the United States caused armed naval forces of the United States to invade the sovereign Hawaiian nation on January 16, 1893, and to position themselves near the Hawaiian Government buildings and the Iolani Palace to intimidate Queen Liliuokalani and her Government;

U.S. Public Law 103-150, known as the Apology Bill,
passed by Congress and signed by President William Clinton in 1993

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We walked up the rim of Kukahau’ula, carrying the flags of our nation. These are our symbols, much like Mauna Kea is our symbol. This is our mountain. This is our temple. This is our people.

–Kapono Aluli Souza
upon reaching the summit of Mauna Kea after hiking from sea level
August 12, 2002

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We are now at the top of Kukahau‘ula. And we’re doing this for our Hawaiian nation, for ourselves, for our Akua, our ‘aumakua, the entire Ka Lahui.

–Clarence Kukauakahi Ching
upon reaching the summit of Mauna Kea after hiking from sea level
August 12, 2002

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History of the establishment of the Hawaiian Kingdom

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It’s the standard of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i. It’s the standard of independent Hawai‘i. I consider myself a Hawaiian national. This whole illegal occupation does not change that. Nobody asked me if I am an American citizen or not. If they ask me, I tell them I’m not. I’m a Hawaiian subject.

–Baron Kaho’ola Ching
Upon reaching the summit of Mauna Kea after hiking from sea level
August 12, 2002

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What is a Hawaiian subject?

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Whereas, the indigenous Hawaiian people never directly relinquished their claims to their inherent sovereignty as a people or over their national lands to the United States, either through their monarchy or through a plebiscite or referendum;

U.S. Public Law 103-150, known as the Apology Bill,
passed by Congress and signed by President William Clinton in 1993

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The Hawaiian Kingdom was never given to the United States government. It was taken. If something is stolen, you can never have ownership of it.

–Anthony Ako
testimony at public meeting on Mauna Kea Science Reserve Master Plan
May 1999

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This is Hawai‘i and you folks should recognize it as a nation.

–Reynolds Kamakawiwo‘ole
testimony at public meeting on Mauna Kea Science Reserve Master Plan
May 1999

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The Royal Order of Kamehameha I, by our protocols, must protect the iwi of our ancestors and all that is sacred to our Kingdom. We believe the Kingdom of Hawai‘i exists because all attempts to overthrow the Kingdom of Hawai’i have failed.

Therefore, we remind all Hawaiian subjects and all peoples that the United States of America, the state of Hawai’i and its agencies have no legal jurisdiction here in our fatherland.

Statement of Royal Order of Kamehameha I
Moku o Mamalahoa, Heiau Helu Elua
read by Jonathan Naone at Hawai’i Island Burial Council meeting
March 30, 2000

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The 1893 attempted overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom

The Annexation That Never Was, the purported annexation of Hawai’i to the United States in 1898

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The Royal Order of Kamehameha has taken the stand. The Kingdom still exists. Always has and always will. And we invite all our brothers with different political views, come, come, come, come. Never mind. Stop fighting. There's nothing to fight about. We're just trying to find the best, sharpest spear. But we will win. We probably have already won.

–Ali’i ‘Aimoku Ali’i Sir Paul K. Neves
Royal Order of Kamehameha I, Moku o Mamalahoa, Heiau Helu Elua
summit of Mauna Kea
December 21, 1999

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Aloha kakou. For the record, this is not a testimony. The Order of Kamehameha does not give testimony to those who have no jurisdiction. This is for your courtesy.

The Royal Order of Kamehameha's position is that the Kingdom still exists, the treaties still exist.

–Ali’i ‘Aimoku Ali’i Sir Paul K. Neves
Royal Order of Kamehameha I, Moku o Mamalahoa, Heiau Helu Elua
statement to University of Hawai’i Board of Regents
previous to their vote on the Mauna Kea Science Reserve Master Plan
June 15, 2000

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Whereas, from 1826 until 1893, the United States recognized the independence of the Kingdom of Hawaii, extended full and complete diplomatic recognition to the Hawaiian Government, and entered into treaties and conventions with the Hawaiian monarchs to govern commerce and navigation in 1826, 1842, 1849, 1875, and 1887;

U.S. Public Law 103-150, known as the Apology Bill,
passed by Congress and signed by President William Clinton in 1993

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Hawaiian Kingdom international treaties

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The Royal Order of Kamehameha believes in the existence of the Kingdom because the treaties have not been extinguished..

We speak to you today under duress, the occupation of my country and its people. But we speak nevertheless because the land still cries out for justice.

–Ali’i ‘Aimoku Ali’i Sir Paul K. Neves
Royal Order of Kamehameha I, Moku o Mamalahoa, Heiau Helu Elua
Statement, Contested Case Hearing on Conservation District Use Application
for NASA / Keck Outrigger Telescopes Project
Sept. 17, 2002

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History of U.S. occupation of Hawai’i

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Hawaiian group asserts claim to Mauna Kea
by Janet Snyder
Hawai’i Tribune-Herald
Dec. 12, 1999

A Native Hawaiian group that considers itself the modern embodiment of the overthrown Hawaiian monarchy held an overnight vigil and ceremonies this weekend to declare jurisdiction over Mauna Kea, the expanded development of which they oppose.

"This is an appropriate time to exercise our sovereignty and to fulfill our responsibility with regards to kingdom law," said the [Royal Order of Kamehameha's] ali’i of East Hawai’i, Paul K. Neves.

"What we're doing is taking back jurisdiction over Mauna Kea. The care of Mauna Kea is within our jurisdiction, no one else's."

"The Royal Order of Kamehameha strongly suggests that anybody who wants to do anything on Mauna Kea need to talk to the people who own it," Neves said.

"The Royal Order of Kamehameha is prepared to protect and defend the honor and integrity of the Native Hawaiian people," Neves said. "No more groveling."

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The issue is not the importance of astronomy versus the native world view. This is not the concern. In fact, the real issue is native versus settler, colonizer versus colonized. And that's because the relationships that the native people have to the land are of a power structure that is different from the power structure that upholds this board, this state and the federal government which pumps millions of dollars into this industry called astronomy.

Pi’ilani Smith
statement to University of Hawai’i Board of Regents
previous to their vote on the Mauna Kea Science Reserve Master Plan
June 15, 2000

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Whereas, the Republic of Hawaii also ceded 1,800,000 acres of crown, government and public lands of the Kingdom of Hawaii, without the consent of or compensation to the Native Hawaiian people of Hawaii or their sovereign government;

U.S. Public Law 103-150, known as the Apology Bill,
passed by Congress and signed by President William Clinton in 1993

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I read that master draft [Mauna Kea Science Reserve Master Plan]. Opening statement, first page, executive summary: “Mauna Kea is owned by the state of Hawai’i.”

The master plan is discredited in my eyes. The state doesn’t own Mauna Kea. It belongs to the Hawaiian people. Mauna Kea is ceded lands, ceded lands that were stolen from the Hawaiian Kingdom. This is acknowledged in federal law. We are the ones with the right.

We have major problems here.

Many of the countries that are involved … come from all over the world: Brazil, Canada, UK, Taiwan, not to mention the United States, Japan. We are looking at an international incident, misuse of lands and subjecting the native people to oppression. And you want to talk about education? I suggest you get educated. Get educated on the issue of Hawaiian lands and native rights to the lands. Our sentiments are for the land and the appropriate use of it.

What you're really asking is for the Hawaiian people just to give it up, give up the rights.

Pi’ilani Smith
testimony at public meeting on Mauna Kea Science Reserve Master Plan
May 1999

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If these lands were still ruled by a sovereign Hawaiian government…the observatories, along with every other user on these lands would be paying rent to us for the use of that land.

Le’a Kanehe
testimony at public meeting on Mauna Kea Science Reserve Master Plan
May 1999

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Paul Neves (Royal Order of Kamehameha): Whose land is this land?

Lisa Munger (Counsel for University of Hawai’i): Objection, calls for legal conclusion.

Michael Gibson (Contested Case Hearing Officer): What is your understanding of who owns the land?

Rolf-Peter Kudritsky (Director, Institute for Astronomy): My understanding is, when I look at this from the legal situation, how it appears to me, it belongs to the State of Hawai’i and has been leased to the university.

Paul Neves: Who has say over the use of the land?

Lisa Munger: Objection, calls for legal conclusion, beyond the scope of his testimony.

Michael Gibson: I’ll sustain that objection.

Paul Neves: Are you aware of the United States Public Law 103-150 that reaffirms that Hawaiian people have never relinquished their sovereignty to the United States?

Rolf-Peter Kudritsky: I’m not aware of it in detail, but, of course, I've read about it.

Transcript
Contested case hearing on Conservation District Use Application
for NASA / Keck Outrigger Telescopes Project

April 2003

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I’m not going to do a history lesson for you folks because a lot of people don’t need it, but a lot of scientists do. Because the idea of trust and the idea of broken trust is what is underlying this whole problem.

–Jill Nunokawa
testimony at public meeting on Mauna Kea Science Reserve Master Plan
May 1999

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Section 1. Acknowledgment and apology.
The Congress –
(3) apologizes to Native Hawaiians on behalf of the people of the United States for the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii on January 17, 1893 with the participation of agents and citizens of the United States, and the deprivation of the rights of Native Hawaiians to self-determination;

U.S. Public Law 103-150, known as the Apology Bill,
passed by Congress and signed by President William Clinton in 1993

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Did Congress apologize to the correct people? Read Keanu Sai’s analysis of the Apology Bill

Read the July 5, 2001 Hawaiian Kingdom Complaint filed with U.N. Security Council against the United States

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websites:

Hawaiian Kingdom

Hawaiian Kingdom Presentation to the Permanent Court of Arbitration – The Hague


Hawaiian Society of Law and Politics

Hawai’i Nation

Hawaiian Independence Blog

U.S. Public Law 103-150 (Apology Bill)

Perspectives on Hawaiian Sovereignty

‘Ilio’ulaokalani

Sovereign Stories – online resources

People and Places connected with the Annexation of Hawai’i

Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

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books

bibliography, University of Hawai’i library, Hawai’i Pacific Section

Hawai’i’s Story by Hawai’i’s Queen

Aloha Betrayed – Native Hawaiian Resistance to American Colonialism
by Noenoe Silva

Dismembering Lahui: A History of the Hawaiian Nation to 1887
by Jonathan K. Osorio


Native Books – Na Mea Hawai’i
History of Hawai’i

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videos/DVDs

We Are Who We Were

Act of War – The Overthrow of the Hawaiian Nation

Aloha Quest – Part 1

Scenes from the Centennial

The Tribunal

July 4th at the Palace

Then There Were None

 

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